2016 Prism Award 2017-01-18T16:15:35+00:00

Insulsteel Honored with Prestigious PRISM Award from Charleston Home Builders Association

Steve and Tina Bostic (middle and right) accept the Most Innovative Housing Project Award from Matt Bell, Member of the Board of Directors for the Charleston Home Builders Association and Interactive Sales Manager with The Post & Courier (left).

Steve and Tina Bostic (middle and right) accept the Most Innovative Housing Project Award from Matt Bell, Member of the Board of Directors for the Charleston Home Builders Association and Interactive Sales Manager with The Post & Courier (left).

Charleston, SC, November 16, 2016 —

Insulsteel, Charleston’s most energy efficient custom design and homebuilding firms, was honored with the 2016 PRISM Award for Most Innovative Housing Project during a ceremony, presented by the Charleston Home Builders Association.

The PRISM Awards, sponsored by The Post & Courier and South State Bank, have recognized Charleston’s leaders in construction and design of new homes for the past 28 years.

Phillip Ford, Executive Director of the Charleston Home Builders Association commented, “This year the CHBA created a new category for our PRISM Awards “The Most Innovative Housing Project.” We are pleased to announce that Insulsteel of S.C. was the first recipient of this prestigious award for their custom home built on Johns Island.”

“Our homeowner and entire design, engineering and construction team were extremely honored to receive the PRISM award.” said Insulsteel CEO Steve Bostic.

This high performance home previously won numerous National Awards including Home Innovation Award Winner by the US Department of Energy, the US Green Building Council Certification at LEED Platinum Level and EPA’s Indoor airPLUS Award for superior indoor air quality.

This national award winning home, built on Johns Island, was designed and built by Insulsteel and features the company’s EcoShell technology. In addition, this custom home was built to withstand winds up to 200 mph and previously survived a tornado “direct hit” on 9/25/2015 with no structural damage to the house and roof top solar system. Many other homes in the neighborhood were severely damaged or destroyed by winds that exceeded 160 mph.